Udon Soup

This udon soup recipe is perfect for lunch or dinner, especially when you’re pressed for time. It’s a quick, healthy and versatile dish to make. You can mix and match any vegetable you have on hand. Just keep in mind that some vegetables may need a longer cooking time than others, remember to adapt the recipe accordingly.

Correction: In the video I say Udon noodles are rice noodles, they are in fact made with wheat flour. Please forgive my slip.

Vegan Udon Soup

A delicious and healthy meal that's easy to make

Ingredients
4 cups water
2 tbsp soy sauce
4 tbsp miso
1/2 lb shiitake or portobello mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
2 cups mixed veggies
2 packets of frozen udon noodles (thick, pre-cooked noodles)
1/2 lb organic tofu, cubed
4 sprigs scallions or 6 leaves of chard, sliced

Directions

  1. 1. Boil water in a large sauce pan.
  2. Add miso, soy sauce, vegetables and mushrooms to the boiling water and mix well.
  3. Add the udon noodles once the both with vegetable begins to boil. Let them cook for about 2 minutes or until they’ve loosened up and have heated all the way through.
  4. Add the scallions/chard and tofu. Let them cook for about 1 minutes and the soup is ready to eat.

Makes 2 hearty servings

About Lydia Grossov


Lydia has been a passionate cook since she was 13 years old, a vegetarian/now vegan for a over 21 years, a graphic designer for over 18.... read her full bio or send her a message here.

Comments
4 Responses to “Udon Soup”
  1. B says:

    Hi, I like your food recipe videos – I hope you guys will make more of these in 2012.

    Thanks.

  2. Daniela says:

    Finally! i found a vegan Udon recipe! Thanks!!
    Just one thing..I’ve read that miso should be added to soup when it’s about to be eaten since it shouldn’t boil.

    • Hi Daniela,
      Thanks for mentioning that miso should not be boiled. We (Mauro and I) boil it with the noodles to add flavor We think the noodles are tastier that way. In our opinion, if you boil the miso or add it to very hot water, you’re still killing the enzymes. Anyhow, we used an inexpensive miso paste (I’ve read that the ezymatic quality of the cheaper brands isn’t that high) for this udon soup. If you buy the more expensive and higher quality miso, don’t boil it or add it to piping hot soup, wait for the soup to cool down a bit and add it just before serving. Cheers!

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